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Keane Law Firm

Keane Law Firm

Child Burn Injury Blog

Browse our blog posts to stay current on issues related to child burn injuries. This regularly updated blog will discuss how child burn injury cases are handled and other important information that parents should know to help their children recover.


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10/17/2009
Christopher Keane
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In Florida, Michael Brewer’s assailants are in custody, Matthew Bent, Denver Jarvis, Jeremy Jarvis, Steven Shelton and Jesus Mendez face criminal charges for burning their victim on over 80% of his body for a $40.00 video game. Michael Brewer is in critical condition with second-degree burns. He faces months of surgeries and a lengthy stay in the burn unit at Jackson Memorial Hospital.

 

For now these five neighborhood thugs are housed where they can’t hurt another human-being. The community in Florida is a little safer without them on the streets. 

 

The Keane Law Firm seeks to raise public awareness about child burn injuries, child abuse prevention and the rights of children that have been catastrophically injured. Please call the office or visit our website for a consultation. Our website library contains information and resources for burn victims.  

http://www.keanelaw.com/
Phone# 415-398-2777
Address: Keane Law Firm, 1388 Haight Street, No. 244, San Francisco, CA  94117 
Email: [email protected]

Attorney Christopher Keane has devoted his Bay Area practice to representing children whose lives have been irrevocably altered by abuse, neglect, injury, or death. He is a member of the San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center (SFCAPC), and is currently serving as the President on their Board of Directors. The prestigious Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory Bar Registry of Preeminent Lawyers has awarded Christopher Keane a top rating and, reflecting his dedication to professional excellence. In addition, Mr. Keane is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum Top Trial Lawyers in America, listed in the top 500 Plaintiff's attorneys in America by Lawdragon.com and as a principal member of Keane Law has acted as lead plaintiff’s lawyer on a number of successful multi-million dollar cases.

 



Category: Burns

10/16/2009
Christopher Keane
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In Florida, 15-year-old Michael Brewer is critically injured from burns sustained during an assault. A witness reported that five boys set Michael on fire using rubbing alcohol and a lighter. The assault happened at Deerfield Beach apartment complex.  The burning took place after a conflict arose between the boys over a video game and a failed attempt to steal a bike from the injured boy’s family. The Broward County Sherriff’s Department is handling the investigation. The boys face charges that may be handled in adult court. The boy that ignited the fire with a lighter faces attempted second-degree murder. 

 The Keane Law Firm seeks to raise public awareness about child burn injuries, child abuse prevention and the rights of children that have been catastrophically injured. Please call the office or visit our website for a consultation.  Our library contains information and resources for burn victims.

http://www.keanelaw.com/
Phone# 415-398-2777
Address: Keane Law Firm, 1388 Haight Street, No. 244, San Francisco, CA  94117  
Email: [email protected]

Attorney Christopher Keane has devoted his Bay Area practice to representing children whose lives have been irrevocably altered by abuse, neglect, injury, or death. He is a member of the San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center (SFCAPC), and is currently serving as the President on their Board of Directors. The prestigious Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory Bar Registry of Preeminent Lawyers has awarded Christopher Keane a top rating and, reflecting his dedication to professional excellence. In addition, Mr. Keane is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum Top Trial Lawyers in America, listed in the top 500 Plaintiff's attorneys in America by Lawdragon.com and as a principal member of Keane Law has acted as lead plaintiff’s lawyer on a number of successful multi-million dollar cases.



Category: Burns

1/7/2009
Christopher Keane
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In Denver, preliminary hearings were held Monday for Isela Reyes-Talamantes and John Vigil. Both are defendants in the case involving the death of Elijah Archuleta. Elijah was two years-old when he died from scalding burn injuries. Prosecutors argue that the defendants waited nine hours before seeking medical attention for their son.  

DO YOU HAVE A SERIOUS OR CATASTROPHIC INJURY, SPINAL CORD INJURY, BRAIN INJURY, BURN, SHAKEN BABY SYNDROME, WRONGFUL DEATH OR CHILD ABUSE CASE OR LAWSUIT AND NEED A PERSONAL INJURY LAWYER OR ATTORNEY FOR A CHILD OR CHILDREN?
http://www.keanelaw.com/
Phone# 415-398-2777
Address: Keane Law Firm, 530 Jackson Street, Second Floor, San Francisco, CA 94133
Email: [email protected]

Attorney Christopher Keane has devoted his Bay Area practice to representing children whose lives have been irrevocably altered by abuse, neglect, injury, or death. He is a member of the San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center (SFCAPC), and is currently serving as the co-Vice President on their Board of Directors. The prestigious Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory Bar Registry of Preeminent Lawyers has awarded Christopher Keane a top rating and, reflecting his dedication to professional excellence. In addition, Mr. Keane is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum Top Trial Lawyers in America, listed in the top 500 Plaintiff's attorneys in America by Lawdragon.com and as a principal member of Keane Law has acted as lead plaintiff’s lawyer on a number of successful multi-million dollar cases.



Category: Burns

1/6/2009
Christopher Keane
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In Harris County, Alexandra Galaviz, 22-month-old, died from injuries sustained in a mobile home fire this past weekend. Originally, she was taken to Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center and then flown to University Hospital in San Antonio due to the severity of her injuries. The fire occurred in a mobile home located in the 11000 block of Ell Road around 12:15 pm on Saturday. News stories report that other family members were injured in the fire, including her sister and her father.   

A child has died from injuries sustained in a fire. The Keane Law Firm represents children that have been catastrophically injured from fire injuries.  Please call us, the burn injury law firm for a timely case evaluation at 888-592-KIDS or 415-398-2777.  You may visit our website at www.keanelaw.com – we will determine the facts of the case and file a claim to hold those responsible to pay for the damages to protect the injured child’s future interests. In a child burn lawsuit, we will recover for victims and their families. We represent injured children nationwide.



Category: Burns

11/17/2008
Christopher Keane
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Fire investigators are looking for answers to what caused the fire at the apartment building Kristopher Love resided in with his mother. Anela Hobbs suffered burn injuries as a result of her attempt to save her son from the fire. Neighbors also struggled in an attempt to save his life. News reports say the family’s fire detectors were in working order.

Burns and fires are one of the leading causes of death for children. In fact, burn injuries are the second most common cause of death in children, second to motor vehicle accidents. Thousands of children are hospitalized every year with burn injuries. Approximately 3,000 children die a year from burn injuries.  Approximately 500 children die in fires annually. Approximately 83, 000 children are treated in emergency departments annually for burn injuries. If burn injuries are severe, the survivors suffer varying degrees of permanent physical disfigurement and psychological trauma. Burns are widely regarded as one of the most painful and complex injuries that a victim may endure.  Survival and recovery from burn injuries is often very difficult and lengthy with serious complications along the way. In fact, statistics show that children under four years old are two times more likely to sustain a burn injury than older children and therefore their death rate from burn injuries is higher. Death rates are highest in the younger population. Males and children are the most likely victims of serious burn injuries.

House fires are responsible for very lethal injuries and are usually associated with inhalation injuries due to smoke exposure. It is known that a majority of burn victims are burned from residential fires. And a majority of house fires or injuries involve cooking equipment or cigarettes. Inhalation injury is almost always associated with structural fire and accounts for a much early and late mortality.  



Category: Burns

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11/17/2008
Christopher Keane
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News stories report that an unidentified toddler died from complications associated from burns over 70% of his body after being submersed in scalding water while in the care of Mr. Christian Perez. The little boy died at Shriners Hospital in Sacramento two months after his injuries were sustained. Allegedly, Christian Perez was caring for the toddler and submersed him in scalding bathwater on April 24, 2008. The investigation revealed that after the submersion, Mr. Perez made contact with his sister and her husband, as well as the mother of the toddler. None of the adults notified authorities or activated the emergency medical system upon hearing of the injury sustained by the toddler. Allegedly within two hours, Patricia Perez and Jose Gamez were in contact with the injured toddler. The couple and Mr. Perez failed to seek medical attention for the injured child. Instead the trio went to a local store and bought skin ointment for the toddler’s injuries. When the toddler began having seizures Mr. Perez sought assistance from EMS. Presently, Mr. Perez is in the Santa Rita jail and is currently being held without bail. Perez’s sister, Patricia, and her husband, Jose, will face felony charges of child endangerment. The defense attorney, LaRue Grim, made a statement to the press implying that the police version of events is not accurate.  

Nearly 75 percent of all scalding burns in children are preventable. Bathtub scalds are often associated with lack of supervision or child abuse. Though a burn injury may be thought to be non-intentional, burn injuries are often preventable. Death related to fire and burns is the third leading cause of injury-related deaths in children between the ages of one and nine years of age. Approximately 3,000 children die a year from burn injuries.  

In the infant and toddler age groups, scalding burns from hot liquid is the most common type of burn. A young child’s skin burns at a lower temperature and a greater depth than that of an older child or an adult’s skin. If a child is scalded by submersion in a hot tub, the injury is life threatening due to the large surface area of injury. Also, younger victims are less likely to survive due to the inability of their young bodies to endure the significant physical stress of injury and healing. The higher burn injury rate in young children can be attributed to the higher likelihood of sustaining injury from non-accidental burns in an abusive domestic setting. 

There are many different types of burn injuries including scalding burns, flash-burns, direct-flame burns, grease burns, flammable liquids, combustible gas, electrical and chemical burns. And there are different degrees of burns, such as first, second and third degree burns. First degree burns involve redness and sensitivity at the sight the burn was sustained immediately after contact with a burn agent. Second degree burns generally involve redness, blisters and pain. Second degree burns may cause scarring and infection to occur. Third degree burns are evident when the burn injury is deeper than the skin, muscle and bone may be involved. Third degree burns will leave scars. The skin of a toddler is thin and prone to injuries such as burns from hot liquids or flames.      



Category: Burns

Labels: neglect
11/17/2008
Christopher Keane
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News reports reveal that playground equipment may cause burn injuries to children during the summer season due to significantly elevated surface heat. One New York parents group is trying to have black top made from recycled tires removed from playgrounds after it was noticed that these surfaces get hot enough to cause burn injuries in children. Most parents are likely to think that slides would be the culprit that retains the most surface heat while glistening in the sun. However, black tops made from recycled rubber get hotter. Black tops get hot enough to burn kids because of the heat retention properties of black and darker surfaces.

 

When “Good Morning America” staff and paramedics from Montgomery County, MD teamed together to measure surface temperatures on playgrounds, their findings were surprising. While it takes 124 degrees to cause first and second degree burns to human skin, children are more susceptible to burn injuries at slightly lower temperatures and will sustain more serious burns to their delicate skin. The surface temperatures of the black top used in playgrounds was measured and found to range between 132 – 142 degrees. The NYC Park Advocates report that black top surface measurements as high as 160 degrees have been found during the summer months.

 

Naturally, one way to prevent burn injuries is to have your child wear shoes. However, should any other part of your child’s body come in contact with the elevated surface temperature found in recycled rubber black top your child may still sustain a burn injury.  Please check the playground surface temperature before letting your child go on the equipment, especially in un-shaded playground areas. Light colored surfaces retain less heat and will have lower surface temperatures.   

 

Thousands of children are hospitalized every year with burn injuries. Developmentally speaking, the skin of younger children is thinner and therefore an injury from burns can cause a greater degree of injury. Keep in mind that a young child’s skin burns at a lower temperature and a greater depth than that of an older child or an adult’s skin. The classification of burns has been traditionally referred to as first, second, third or fourth degree burns. However, the use of terms such as superficial, superficial partial-thickness, deep partial-thickness and full thickness descriptors are becoming more common. Once a burn injury is sustained, different clinical factors present and the victim’s condition may change from day to day. Sometimes these changes make a burn wound worse and may require more treatment in the days following the original injury. So it is hard to tell how extensive an injury is until time goes by and the degree of injury becomes better understood. The degree of injury guides clinical practice and treatment. In general, a child is hospitalized if a superficial burn injury, or worse, exceeds 9% of the total body surface area or if abuse is suspected. And if a full-thickness burn involves 2%, or more of the body surface area the child will be hospitalized. The anatomical location of the injury is also considered while making treatment decisions. Burns to the face, perineum, hands and feet require hospitalization. If 1% body surface area, or greater, of these surface areas are burned, the child will likely be hospitalized. Also requiring special attention are joint areas affected by burn injury. Scarring could cause significant disability and these injuries must be handled carefully.    



Category: Burns

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11/17/2008
Christopher Keane
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Ann Hodge and her family are grieving the death of five-year old Kavon Williams. He was sleeping at his grandmother’s home, a duplex, when fire erupted. At 3:30 am, the duplex caught fire. The cause of the fire is not known at this time. Kavon’s siblings and grandmother managed to escape, but young Kavon was trapped. Fire trucks arrived and rescuers ran inside to find him. He was taken to Children’s Hospital where he was pronounced dead. The grandmother, Barbara Hodge, and one of Kavon’s siblings had to be treated for inhalation injury at a local hospital. Kavon’s sisters and brothers are staying with relatives presently. Kavon is fondly remembered as a happy little boy preparing to start kindergarten this fall. Our sympathy is extended to the relatives and friends of the Hodge family.

Death related to fire and burns is the third leading cause of injury-related deaths in children between the ages of one and nine years of age.  Approximately 3,000 children die a year from burn injuries. House fires are responsible for very lethal injuries and are usually associated with inhalation injuries due to smoke exposure. Approximately 45% of house fire victims die as a result of their complex injuries. Approximately 500 children die in fires annually. Approximately 83, 000 children are treated in emergency departments annually for burn injuries. Death rates are highest in the younger population. Aside from the serious nature of burn injuries, often inhalation injuries complicate the clinical course for burn victims. In fact, burn victims die as a result of inhalation injury. History of fire entrapment leads to a high index of suspicion for inhalation injury. During exposure to fire, the victim inhales toxic fumes that arise from the adjacent environmental agent that is burning. Smoke from combustible items in the environment often cause inhalation injuries to the upper airway and this has a more rapid onset of inflammation. Clues that inhalation injury may have occurred may be found in the mechanism of injury or by listening to the lung sounds. For example, providers will suspect inhalation injury if the burn victim was in a confined space at the time of the trauma.



Category: Burns

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